Have you ever wondered where the National Weather Service gets their storm information? Sure, a lot of it is sent in from various automated and computerized measuring stations, but when the lighting starts flashing, the wind starts blowing and the hailstones start to fall, there’s nothing better than a pair of well-trained eyes to let the forecasters know what’s actually going on.

The people who get out in their cars and trucks, driving the best vantage point to track severe weather are called spotters and they’re a pretty well-trained bunch. That training comes directly from the professional meteorologists at the National Weather Service. In fact, one of those training sessions is coming up this Saturday morning at the MPEC.

The two hour session begins at 9:00 a.m. and covers the things that spotters need to know, things like the identification of key weather features and how to report them properly, but above all, how to do this job safely.

If you’re interested in becoming a weather spotter for the National Weather Service, or just want to have a better understanding of the volatile weather that we all know is headed our way, you’re welcome to attend Saturday morning.

Visit the National Weather Service website to learn more.